Job cuts in mining industry worry SA government

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VENTURES AFRICA – Retrenchments that have been pronounced in South Africa’s mining industry recently were a serious cause for concern for the government, Minister of Mineral Resources, Ngoako Ramatlhodi, admitted on Tuesday.

He was more worried about the fact that these retrenchments were going to add woes to the already ailing South African economy.

Last week, JSE-listed platinum producer, Lonmin, said it would retrench 3 500 workers at its South African mines due to lower platinum prices. Lonmin was among the platinum miners that were affected by the five-month long wage strike earlier last year.

The other platinum miners were Anglo American Platinum (Amplats) and Impala Platinum (Implats). At the time, economists did warn that these strikes would lead to massive job cuts. “We need bold leadership from all in the industry at this time, in order to decisively tackle this matter,” Ramatlhodi said. “Notwithstanding the difficulties faced by the industry currently, the impact of retrenchments on the economy – when we are already grappling with the triple challenge of poverty, unemployment and inequality – will have an adverse impact on the country’s socio-economic development objectives.”

Ben Magara, the Lonmin CEO, said these job cuts were aimed at saving the business for as many workers as possible.
Ramatlhodi said he is poised to escalate the issue for serious talks at the forthcoming gathering of the Mining Industry Growth Development and Employment Task Team (Migdett) principals this week Thursday.

 

Source: New feed23

1000 Nigerian refugee babies get birth certificates at Cameroon’s camp

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Dekunle

• 45S babies born every month
NIGERIAN refugees give birth to 45 children every month at the Minawao refugee camp, Cameroon, aid agencies have said.
Most of the children do not have official birth certificates, the Voice of America (VOA) said.
The government of Cameroon and the United Nations agency – the United Nations High Commission for Commission for Refugees (UNHCR) –  have begun issuing the children birth certificates with the hope the Nigerian government will accept them when the refugees return.
According to Cameroonian authorities, sno fewer than 1000 of such babies have been issued with birth certificates.
Isaak Luka, leader of the group of Nigerian refugees at the Minawao camp in northern Cameroon, expressed gratitude to the aid agencies for helping to establish birth certificates for their new born babies.
Luka said: “We are very grateful because our children will benefit their civic rights. We thank the government of Cameroon and the head of the refugee agency partners and the different UN agencies, without neglecting Non- Governmental Organisations (NGOs) and the Cameroonian government for the attention they reserve for us.”
Aissatou Jowel, told the VOA that it will be painful for her to return to return to her home in Nigeria where she claimed Boko Haram insurgents killed her husband.
She spoke at the Minawao Camp, where she has been staying with her children.
Cameroon, UNHCR deal
Theophile Nguea Beina, the highest Cameroon government official in the area, said the Nigerian children started enjoying their rights to birth registration following negotiations between the government of Cameroon and the UNHCR.
Beina said: “Legally, a right of every child to have a birth certificate and a legal existence has been respected. Socially, these children are not responsible for what happened in their country.
“They are vulnerable and the government of the Republic (Cameroon) cannot stay and see this situation persist.”
UNHCR’s associate reporting officer Djerassem Mbaiorem, said the birth registration does not confer Cameroonian nationality upon the refugee children. But, he said, by establishing a legal record on where a refugee was born and who their parents are, the kids can claim their Nigerian nationality when they become adults.
He said wherever children are born, they have the right to be issued birth certificates, though if they are born in a country different from that of their parents, they have up to 18 years when they become adults to decide to be nationals of that country if the constitution of the country allows him to have the nationality based on the fact that he was born there.
A midwife at the refugee camp, Ombaneme Kaniset, said the camp authority has the mandate to prepare a birth declaration card for each newborn baby and forward it to UNHCR officials working in collaboration with other aid agencies and the government of Cameroon.
According to her, 45 babies are born every month.
Extraordinary circumstances
She said they direct some of the expectant mothers who arrive at the refugee camp from Nigeria with emergency cases to specialists and then encourage them to follow up their prenatal consultation.
She added that some of them have never had prenatal care and most of them do not have medical records since they are running from violence.
Some of the mothers do not know the importance of birth certificates. Benjamin Mambou of the International Emergency and Development Aid (IEDA) relief said they have been educating women who refuse to give their children names and those who refuse to collaborate with birth registration officers.
“We will continue to sensitise (educate) parents who didn’t give us the names of their children, who didn’t identify their children. We will do it or we make sure that will be done,” said Mambou.
“We will continue to educate and assist them in what their children become in the future. They will go to their country, the government of Nigerian will take care of them but firstly here in Cameroon. We take care of them, we give them birth certificates and we assist them.”
UNHCR’s Bawoing Mahamat, who has also been encouraging mothers to register their children at birth, said when the situation in Nigeria stabilises and the refugees agree to return, they will organise a meeting with the Nigerian government to make sure the children are not discriminated against because they were born out of their country.
He said a tripartite meeting of Cameroon, Nigeria and the UNHCR will be convened to examine birth certificates delivered to Nigerian children when calm returns to their country and they agree to return.
The UNHCR reports that since January this year, more than 11,500 Nigerians have arrived in the camp. The government of Cameroon says it has counted more than 74,000 Nigerian refugees in Cameroon and a majority are women and children. About 1,000 have so far received birth certificates.

Source: New feed8

APC: Jonathan’s ministers must defend their actions

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APC

Source: New feed8

Tim Nicot: Second Belgian footballer dies after suffering cardiac arrest

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(CNN)Belgium is coming to terms with a second footballer in their twenties dying of cardiac arrest in the last fortnight.

Tim Nicot, 23, collapsed while playing for fourth-tier club Wilrijk Beerschot in a tournament at Hemiksem, in the province of Antwerp, on Saturday.

Late last month, 24-year-old Lokeren defender Gregory Mertens died in hospital after collapsing as he played in a reserve game.

The death of Nicot, who was put into an induced coma at Antwerp University Hospital after his collapse, was announced by his club on Monday.
Tim Nicot: Second Belgian footballer dies after suffering cardiac arrest

Updated 1640 GMT (2340 HKT) May 11, 2015
Footballer Tim Nicot had been taking part in a tournament in Belgium.
Footballer Tim Nicot had been taking part in a tournament in Belgium.

(CNN)Belgium is coming to terms with a second footballer in their twenties dying of cardiac arrest in the last fortnight.

Tim Nicot, 23, collapsed while playing for fourth-tier club Wilrijk Beerschot in a tournament at Hemiksem, in the province of Antwerp, on Saturday.

Late last month, 24-year-old Lokeren defender Gregory Mertens died in hospital after collapsing as he played in a reserve game.

The death of Nicot, who was put into an induced coma at Antwerp University Hospital after his collapse, was announced by his club on Monday.

Officials wrote on Twitter: “KFCO Wilrijk Beerschot is in mourning. Tim Nicot has just died. We wish family and friends strength.”

A statement on the club’s official website said: “Much too soon, much too young. This morning, Tim Nicot died. He was only 23 years old.

“KFCO Wilrijk Beerschot are searching for the right words to express our feelings, our sorrow. Disbelief, dismay, powerless rage… they all have a place.

“When the doctors described Tim’s condition as critical, it became clear how serious it was. But he fought like a bear, surrounded by his family, his teammates and his many friends.”

The statement thanked Nicot, who wore the No.14 shirt, for everything he had given the club, describing him as “tireless” and praising his relationship with the supporters.

Wilrijk Beerschot have invited supporters to reflect on the player’s life at their Olympic Stadium, where flowers and cards have been left in his memory. A book of condolence has also been opened.
Tim Nicot: Second Belgian footballer dies after suffering cardiac arrest

(CNN)Belgium is coming to terms with a second footballer in their twenties dying of cardiac arrest in the last fortnight.

Tim Nicot, 23, collapsed while playing for fourth-tier club Wilrijk Beerschot in a tournament at Hemiksem, in the province of Antwerp, on Saturday.

Late last month, 24-year-old Lokeren defender Gregory Mertens died in hospital after collapsing as he played in a reserve game.

The death of Nicot, who was put into an induced coma at Antwerp University Hospital after his collapse, was announced by his club on Monday.
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Officials wrote on Twitter: “KFCO Wilrijk Beerschot is in mourning. Tim Nicot has just died. We wish family and friends strength.”

A statement on the club’s official website said: “Much too soon, much too young. This morning, Tim Nicot died. He was only 23 years old.

“KFCO Wilrijk Beerschot are searching for the right words to express our feelings, our sorrow. Disbelief, dismay, powerless rage… they all have a place.

“When the doctors described Tim’s condition as critical, it became clear how serious it was. But he fought like a bear, surrounded by his family, his teammates and his many friends.”

The statement thanked Nicot, who wore the No.14 shirt, for everything he had given the club, describing him as “tireless” and praising his relationship with the supporters.

Wilrijk Beerschot have invited supporters to reflect on the player’s life at their Olympic Stadium, where flowers and cards have been left in his memory. A book of condolence has also been opened.

Figures from throughout Belgian football have paid tribute, with powerhouse club Anderlecht remembering Nicot on Twitter.

Teammate Antonio Muñoz-Herrera, who had urged his friend and colleague to “keep fighting” over the weekend, said he would never be forgotten.

Belgian newspaper Het Laatste Nieuws quoted the player’s father, Alain Nicot, as saying: “Yesterday afternoon, I felt that Tim was losing the fight. His body could not take it any more.

“I cannot comprehend it yet. Twenty-three years old.”

He said the family had been at Nicot’s bedside when he died.

The Gazet Van Antwerpen newspaper reported that cardiologists had called for compulsory heart screenings for athletes after the tragedy, quoting doctor Pedro Brugada as saying: “We must check our cars each year, but not our bodies. That is absurd.”

European football’s governing body Uefa introduced mandatory cardiac testing for all players taking part in its competitions in 2008 following the deaths of Marc-Vivien Foé, Antonio Puerta and Phil O’Donnell.

The Belgian Football Federation was not immediately available for comment.

Source: sutbeatcom