Awilo Logomba collaborates with P Square for new track ‘Enemy Solo’

Featured Image

Ever since this collaboration featuring Congolese superstar Awilo Logomba and Nigerian Afrobeats stars P Square dropped, there’s been a lot of chatter in anticipation of the video and now it’s here.

The official video for the track ‘Enemy Solo’, was directed by Clarence Peters with choreography by Nigeria’s dance queen Kaffy alongside CEO  dancers’ Ezinne Asiugo.

Behind the Scene of Enemy Solo-36 Behind the Scene of Enemy Solo-90

It’s not the best work we’ve seen from Peters, but it’s a dance track, who needs the video anyway?

See some behind the scenes photos from the video shoot below. Photos courtesy Michael Tubes.

Behind the Scene of Enemy Solo-69 Behind the Scene of Enemy Solo-62

Source: living12

What role do women in Nigeria play in the country’s future? More importantly, what’s culture got to do with it?

Featured Image

Harvard Professor Joanna Lipper’s film, The Supreme Price, follows the story of the late Kudirat Abiola- Wife of the late M.K.O Abiola. A successful businessman, politician, philanthropist and the acclaimed winner of the pivotal June 12 elections which shaped the future of Nigeria.

In 1993, Nigeria elected M.K.O. Abiola as president in a historic vote that promised to end years of military dictatorship. Shortly after, the election was annulled and a military coup brought General Sani Abacha into power. M.K.O Abiola was imprisoned and his wife, Kudirat, took over the leadership of the pro-democracy movement. She organized rallies and the longest oil workers strike in Nigerian history, winning international attention for the Nigerian struggle against human rights violations perpetrated by the military dictatorship. Because of this work, she too became a target and was assassinated in 1996.

The film’s Director, Joanna Lipper elegantly dovetails past and present as she tells this story through the eyes of their eldest daughter, Hafsat Abiola, who was about to graduate from Harvard when her mother was murdered. Her father died in prison two years later.

The Supreme Price is a stark exploration of the courage of women like Kudirat, and the struggle that women face in Nigeria’s society today.

We caught up with the filmmaker during the European premiere of the film at the Raindance Film Festival in London and we were bowled over by her passion for women’s rights and the role of film as a platform for getting women seen and heard in the cultural minefield that is Africa.

NL: What inspired you to make a film about Kudirat Abiola?

JL: I was fortunate to meet Hafsat soon after she’d graduated from Harvard. We had both been at Harvard University as students, but we hadn’t met until a few years later. When I first met her, her organisation- Kudirat Abiola Initiative for Democracy (KIND), was still in its infancy. I was so impressed by her composure, her resilience and courage that I followed the evolution of this NGO. When I went for the black heritage festival in Nigeria in 2010, I visited the NGO and I remembered it from when she’d started it from the beginning a few years back. Just building an NGO from scratch is challenging and in particular, this was soon after the transitioning from Military rule to civilian rule after she had been in exile for so long. For her to go back to a country where she lost her parents and experienced all those horrible things and then build something like that and see it grow was amazing. It was really that experience of seeing that happen over time and going from this place myself of incredible sadness after hearing the story for the first time, to this place where I saw incredible hope for Nigeria through this story that sparked this deep curiosity in the future of Nigeria. I’m always interested as a filmmaker in learning from my subjects. When I start a film I don’t have something that I want to prove or an idea that I want to illustrate in the film. What usually inspires me to make a film is that the subjects have interested me so much that I want to learn about the place and learn about their experiences so being able to do that through this film was a process of learning for me.

Hafsat Abiola. Photo credit: Joanna Lipper

Hafsat Abiola. Photo credit: Joanna Lipper

NL: So what was your experience like filming in Nigeria and how long did it take?

JL: I made the film over a period of four years. Travelling to Nigeria at different moments allowed me see Hafsat evolve from running the Kudirat Initiative for democracy to then being  appointed as a special adviser in Ogun state. I would say the experience I got from filming in Nigeria was really positive, because I was able to work with a Nigerian team and I was able to really see and be a part of Nigeria that would never have been accessible to me. You know, within the structure of the Abiola  family compound in Ikeja, but then also going out into Ogun state when Hafsat got her political appointment and seeing that region too. Going out and filming at night was really fascinating to me. Just the beauty and the energy and the sound scape and the colours was great. It was really a way of finding a poetry for the film and finding the vocabulary for the film and all that was as a result of my experience about being there, but also as a result of feeling comfortable there, and being immersed there.

NL: It’s interesting you mentioned you don’t have a point to prove when you start a documentary. In the documentary, you were very direct in showing women in different spheres of life in Nigeria and there were some stark scenes of the struggles women go through in the country. What was going through your mind while you were experiencing that?

JL: I was definitely interested in filming about women from a wide spectrum. I wanted to show women from elite circumstances like Hafsat, but also women in other circumstances that are really in a place where the government is not providing for their needs. The government is not providing for their most basic rights to safe delivery and the maternal mortality rates are abysmal, so I was interested in capturing that side of Nigeria. Not just the side of those who have privilege, but also to look at the universal theme in the story. Because even when there was privilege, there was still oppression. There was oppression within the home and there was pressure from the government and there was violence. You could say that these are two separate spheres and they don’t overlap, but what I think the film is trying to say is that these problems transcend class and they transcend economic status, they happen to women in Nigeria and they have to be looked at.

I think the women in the film, like Dr Joe Odumakin are in positions where for so many years, they’ve been speaking about their thoughts and risking their lives to do that. What the film does is to take the women that have been willing to take those risks and give them an even broader international platform. So that what they’ve been saying at voter education rallies and behind closed doors now suddenly has the weight it should have, which is its demanding an international response and attention. At the same time, the film shows the women who aren’t speaking; you know, the silent shots of women watching, of women walking, of market women. So I was trying to show; who are the women involved in this fight? Who are the ones speaking? Who are the ones not? And when you look at women in Nigeria in general, you see a population (at least I did as a foreigner coming in) that is incredibly visible. I mean, the way they dress is so beautiful, their presence is so powerful. In a way there’s this intrinsic power and film is a unique medium that can capture that. It’s the juxtaposition of the power that is unveiled in the film and the reality of oppression on ground that is preventing that power from being revealed.

NL: One of the reasons women are oppressed in Nigeria is partly due to our culture. How do you think this documentary could inspire women in Africa to balance personal ambition against cultural demands?

JL: While I was in Nigeria I spoke to Amy Oyekunle, who is the Executive Director of KIND about this same question. They’ve come up with this term called ‘Transformational leadership’. This, they believe is going to bring about change in the way women think, but they’re saying it has to be a psychological transformation in the understanding of what makes women of value. The question is, are you of value because of the supporting role you play providing for your family or being a wife? Also, the incredible role that women play in Nigeria as farmers, the reproductive and productive role they’re expected to play. There is a lot of physical labour involved as well, so I think the process of having that sense of integrity that says, ‘I want to be true to myself and what I think is of value to me’ is really important.

One of the things I think that’s really impressive about Kudirat Abiola, comes during one moment in the film. She says “Hafsat, if you could only see what I am doing now, you will be so proud of me”, and Hafsat said, “I’ve always been proud of you”. So, the idea being that she was embarrassed that she didn’t go to college while her daughter was in Harvard, she felt she never did enough. I feel like that was such a poignant and painful moment, because again it brings up this question: Can women just be valued for who they are? Not only what they do and what they accomplish? I think Kudirat felt that this public role that she took on and the struggle that she had, she sacrificed her life for it and she sacrificed her life for Nigeria at the same time. When Hafsat was growing up, she saw the personal sacrifices she was making to stay in the marriage and she gave her children the opportunity to be educated in the US. The title, The Supreme Price is not only about Martyrdom, although that is the central reference, it’s about the personal sacrifices on a daily basis that women have to make. Hafsat is living away most of the time from her family and Kudirat had to do the same thing in order for Hafsat to get educated in the US. You see all the sacrifices that are made along the way and then the question is why? We have to see if there is a way to change that patriarchal structure and make it so that less sacrifices have to be made.

NL: Do you think we have a lack of female role models in Nigeria?

JL: I think there are a lot of role models,  but I don’t think that they have the right medium like film that allows them to be widely accessible and seen by other women in Nigeria and around the world. The medium of film is taking the everyday role model that exists in every community. I think it’s a question of identifying them and giving them a platform, whether it’s through film, through a website or short video. Giving them a platform to have influence and to be accessible. I think the question of what makes someone really accessible is really important. Seeing someone at a rally from a distance, yes, they can be interesting and they can make a speech, but do you know their personal compromises or their inner battles?

I think that the capacity of film to influence how young girls are able to access role models and feel closer to them cannot be overemphasised and I think films are crucial for this, which is why I hope this film will service that. To be able to bring someone who could be seen as a role model, by the fact that she’s made bold controversial decisions and maintained her own integrity.

NL: Kudirat Abiola is one of the few Nigerian women who took risks by coming out to speak against the military government and ultimately paid the supreme price. Do you think young girls and women in Nigeria today would be prepared to take that risk given what happened to Kudirat?

JL: I think the film would do the opposite of discouraging girls to take risks and speak up. The message of the film is quite the opposite and I think that’s why Hafsat has dedicated her life to fighting for women’s rights and ensuring their voices are heard- She couldn’t let the military win. In any of these conflicts all over the world, often times when civilian rule takes over, the situation of women doesn’t improve, even though they played a key role in overtaking the dictatorship and risked their lives, they’re status doesn’t improve. Their representation in elected political offices doesn’t improve, so this is now the current fight to be fought. I think the issue is not will women and girls be willing to run? I think the question is can the structure change enough that the ones that want to can be empowered to. It’s not just that there aren’t people available to do it, it’s more about taking the women who want to do it and getting them to the next level.

Joanna Lipper’s film ‘The Supreme Price’ is out in UK cinemas now.

 

 

*This interview was initially published in the Winter/14 issue of Naija Living magazine.

Source: living12

President Jonathan’s remarks at the presentation of handover notes to Buhari

Featured Image

HIS EXCELLENCY, PRESIDENT GOODLUCK EBELE JONATHAN, GCFR, ON THE OCCASION OF THE PRESENTATION OF HAND OVER NOTES TO THE PRESIDENT-ELECT, MUHAMMADU BUHARI, GCFR THURSDAY, 28TH MAY, 2015
1. I welcome you all to this occasion of the formal presentation of the Hand-over notes of my Administration to the in-coming Administration of the President-Elect, General Muhammadu Buhari.

2. This event and tomorrow’s inauguration of a new administration are truly historic as it is the first time in the history of our nation that we are witnessing the democratic and orderly transfer of power at the Federal level from one political party to another.

3. The Hand-over notes which we now present, contain the governance philosophy, strategies, policies, programmes and activities of my Administration for the period – 2011-2015. Also to be found in the notes are the objectives, targets and implementation strategies, achievements and challenges of our key policies, schemes, initiatives as well as the status of commitments and liabilities of the various MDAs.

4. As we hand over the affairs of the nation, it is appropriate to recall that at inception, in May 2011, we committed ourselves to consolidating national unity through democratization and good governance. Our assessment then, and our firm belief ever since, is that the unity of Nigeria, the security, well-being, greater freedoms and opportunities for all citizens must remain the primary objectives of government.

5. The Agenda for National Transformation which we did our best to implement consisted of clear and consistent governance strategies, policies, plans, programmes and projects, in all facets of our national life. Emphasis was placed on human and state security, democratization, sound economic management, as well as structural and institutional reforms.

6. Our foremost concern was the unity of Nigeria. In keeping with that concern, we engineered a process that began with a review of issues outstanding from previous Constitutional Conferences by the Belgore Committee. After that, we widened political consultations through a National Dialogue that was orchestrated through the Okurounmu Committee. These culminated in the all-inclusive National Conference which unanimously reaffirmed that Nigeria must remain united and indivisible.

7. The Conference also made resolutions and recommendations for serious constitutional, political and governance reforms, which we have forwarded to the National Assembly for appropriate legislative action. It is our hope that the incoming Government will accord the Report of the National Conference the very high priority that it deserves, as a genuine expression of the will of our people.

8. The recognition that the starting point for good governance is the legitimacy of the government itself informed our commitment to promoting free and fair elections.

9. It also motivated innovations in the management and conduct of elections which we undertook. Hopefully, in the years ahead, those innovations will be properly and fully implemented so that Nigerians will be even more assured of the integrity of the electoral system and the legitimacy of any government that it produces.

10. To strengthen the social contract between the government and the governed, we institutionalized the rule of law as well as the independence of the legislature and the judiciary. We also promoted group and individual freedoms. As a result, there is vast expansion in democratic, social and economic space for all citizens.

11.Our nation and citizens faced many new challenges over the past four years but the greatest was the vastly increased menace of Boko Haram with their mindless terror, mass killings, utter ruthlessness, kidnapping of innocent children and other unspeakable acts of brutality.

12. We should all remember that Boko Haram’s emergence predated our administration going as far back as 2002. The group however became extremely malignant with the killing of its leader, Mohammed Yusuf in July 2009.

13. It therefore became an urgent task for us to effectively confront the great threat Boko Haram posed to the security and well-being of our people. To do so, we overhauled and virtually reinvented our security architecture to confront Boko Haram and its insurgency. We re-organized our security apparatus. We re-equipped and fully motivated our forces.

14. Victory is now in sight and within our reach. However, the cost in blood of citizens and heroes; and the diversion of national treasure from urgent needs for development have been very high. While more than 500 women and children have been rescued from the clutches of Boko Haram thus far by our security forces, it remains my sincere hope and prayer that our beloved daughters from Chibok will soon be reunited with us.

15. I wish to thank the Nigerian people for their resilience and patience. I also wish to pay very special and personal tribute to all the men and women of our valiant armed forces and security agencies. Their sacrifice and dedication have brought us thus far.

16. While striving to overcome our national security challenges, we still gave necessary attention to economic development. Our goal was to achieve long-term economic growth and stability, improve the quality and quantum of infrastructure and enhance human capital development.

17. Our financial system reforms included the Treasury Single Account [TSA] that unified the structure of government accounts for all MDAs and thereby brought order to cash flow management; and Government Integrated Financial Management Information System [GIFMIS] was introduced to plug leakages and waste of resources. The Integrated Payroll and Personnel Information System [IPPIS] weeded out 60,450 ghost workers in 359 out of 425 MDAs, yielding N185.4 billion in savings to the Federal government.

18. Improved Revenue Mobilization was achieved through improvements in the laws and compliance measures. In 2013 alone, these measures resulted in a 69% rise in Federal tax revenues from N2.8 trillion to N4.8 trillion. Also, Waiver Policy and Trade Facilitation were reformed to create a more rational regime. Our emphasis shifted to granting waivers to specific sectors instead of individual companies and the Sovereign Wealth Fund was established to provide stabilization from external shocks, provide funding for critical infrastructure and savings for future generations.

19. Our Financial Sector reforms addressed the issues of inefficiencies in the coordination and monitoring of the financial system. Our policies promoted transparency, better risk management, new banking models and payment systems. We established the Assets Management Corporation of Nigeria as a resolution mechanism for toxic banking assets. We strengthened banking supervision and enhanced public confidence in Nigerian Banks
​.​

20. Similarly, we undertook innovative reforms for job creation and repositioned the manufacturing, agriculture and housing sectors. Specifically, it was observed that over the years, job creation did not keep pace with economic growth. Thus unemployment, especially amongst the youth was assuming alarming dimensions.

21. To address this, my administration made job creation a key consideration for all programmes in the Transformation Agenda. Emphasis was also shifted towards empowering youths to become entrepreneurs rather than job seekers, through such initiatives as Youth Enterprise with Innovation in Nigeria (YOU-WIN), Graduate Internship Scheme (GIS), the SURE-P Technical Vocational Education and Training Programme (TVET) and the Youth Employment in Agriculture Programme (YEAP).

22. Manufacturing in Nigeria faces many challenges, including poor power supply, high cost of input, high cost of doing business, multiple taxation, poor infrastructure and lack of synergy with the labour market. To address these problems, we launched several programmes and initiatives including the National Industrial Revolution Plan and a new National Automobile Policy designed to boost domestic car production and expand existing capacity. Since then, five new private vehicle assembly plants have been established.

23. Agriculture is critical to national survival and yet the sector was besieged with many problems. By year 2010, Nigeria was the second largest importer of food in the world, spending about N1.3 trillion on the importation of fish, rice and sugar alone.

24. The reforms we introduced in agriculture dramatically increased local production of staple food and saved us vast amounts of money that we would have spent on the importation of food items.

25. To address the glaring inadequacy of critical national infrastructure, we focused on the Power Sector, Roads, Railways, Aviation, Ports and Harbours as well as on Water and Sanitation, Information and Communication Technology.

26. My government introduced the Power Sector Roadmap in 2010. Since then, we have privatized the generation and distribution aspects in a most transparent process. Obstacles to the private sector investments in power supply were removed and we developed cost effective electricity tariff to make the sector more attractive. It remains our hope that the successor companies to PHCN and also the private sector will step forward with the necessary investment to make the power reform work.

27. The major challenge in the road sector in Nigeria is the high cost of building roads and it continues to rise. The other challenge is the fact that because of regular use, roads are one of the fastest depreciating assets in developing countries.

28. To address this, Government has developed the required legal and regulatory framework and created opportunities for Private Public Partnership (PPP) in road construction and maintenance.

29. From Ore/Benin Road, Lagos/Ibadan Expressway to the Kano/Maiduguri dualisation projects, we made concerted efforts to address age-long problems of delays in construction, design defect, neglect and ineffective maintenance. The construction of the historic Second Niger Bridge has also commenced, and on completion, it will open new and far-reaching opportunities for greater trade and interaction among our people.

30. In the Aviation Sector, our government developed a Master Plan to institutionalise safety and security, and to develop infrastructure at the airports and local airlines. We embarked on the reconstruction and rehabilitation of 22 airports nationwide. Construction work on five new international terminals in Lagos, Abuja, Port Harcourt, Kano and Enugu are also on-going.

31. There has been a revolution in rail transportation. We rehabilitated the old narrow gauge network and ensured that it has served our people steadily for three years running with new coaches and improved expanded services nationwide.

32. We are in the construction stages of a new national network for standard gauge speed-train services, with the new rail line segment, from Abuja to Kaduna, successfully completed. In addition, we have initiated the process for the construction of an ultramodern coastal rail line that will run from Lagos to Calabar, with a link to Onitsha.

33. We have also successfully completed the dredging of River Niger, from Warri in Delta State to Baro in Niger State, and completed construction works for the Onitsha River Port. Other River Ports at Baro, Lokoja and Oguta, are at advanced construction stages. Working with the states and development partners, we have facilitated the process towards the development of two new deep sea ports at Lekki in Lagos, and Ibaka in Akwa Ibom. We have also implemented reforms to streamline the clearing regime in existing ports, increasing cargo turnover time and easing business for all users.

34. In the oil and gas sector, our local content policy has continued to empower Nigerian companies, particularly in technical and engineering projects. The Gas Revolution Industrial Park in Delta State is unprecedented in the sub
​-​sector, and will not only deliver Africa’s biggest industrial park, but all the accompanying benefits to local industry and job creation.

35. We recognized Human Capital as the most important agent for transformational development. Our reforms in this sector focused on Health, Education and Social Development and also on Women and Youth Empowerment and Social Safety Nets.

36. In the Health sector, the comprehensive National Strategic Health Development Plan (NSHDP) of 2011 laid the foundation for widening access and improving the quality of healthcare with lower infant mortality rates and higher life expectancy for the populace. Our effective curtailment of the Ebola epidemic has continued to receive worldwide acclaim as an example in prompt and effective national disease management. On our watch, guinea-worm has been eradicated from Nigeria and we are on the verge of wiping out polio entirely.

37. In the Education sector, our objectives are clear and precise. They emphasise expansion of access and the upgrade of quality. I am proud that we have widened access by establishing 18 more Federal Universities and other specialized polytechnics. We strengthened TETFUND and used it to boldly address the problems of inadequate infrastructure in the existing institutions.

38. I am particularly proud of our efforts with regards to Early Childhood Education and Out-of-School Children. We provided modern hybrid Almajiri Education Programme in the North, attended to schooling needs of boys in the South-East and ensured the construction of special girls’ schools in 13 States of the Federation to improve girl-child education. We expanded opportunities for open and distance learning and provided scholarships at all levels to help improve access to quality education for bright and promising Nigerians.

39. We have promoted gender-mainstreaming with commensurate priority and opportunities for our womenfolk, beginning with ensuring that not less than 30 per cent of key Federal appointments go to women. Other initiatives that we have taken include: the National Gender Policy, Establishment of Gender Units in Federal MDAs, Women Empowerment Training Programmes, Micro-Credit for Women, Social Safety Net Programmes and the Conditional Cash Transfer (CCT) Scheme.

40. My Administration has emphasized giving a free hand to our Anti-corruption agencies such as the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) and the Independent Corrupt Practices Commission (ICPC). We preferred that they mature into strong institutions instead of being the images, the hammer and the anvil of a strong man. We must encourage them to abide by the rule of law and due process instead of resorting to dramatic or illegal actions orchestrated for cheap applause
​.​

41. Beyond the very impressive records of enhanced convictions by statutory anti-corruption agencies like the EFCC and ICPC, our other strategy has been to fashion economic policies that deliver higher deterrence and frustrate concealment. In this regard, the Bureau of Public Procurement has played a central role and impacted strongly on the fight against corruption.

42. In Sports, we have improved our national performance in team and individual events. The disappointment of not qualifying to defend our African Football Championship was cushioned by a decent FIFA World Cup appearance, an Under-17 World Cup win in addition to other victories in other international football tournaments and the Paralympics. We have also encouraged excellence in other sports, apart from football, resulting in exceptional performance in international sporting events, especially in athletics.

43. Our foreign policy position remains strong. In October 2013, Nigeria was elected as a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council for the second time on our watch. Our country had only served in that capacity thrice before 2011, since independence in 1960. Our Administration also played a leading role in the resolution of security and political challenges in our sub-region, particularly in Niger, Cote D’Ivoire, Mali, Guinea-Bissau and Burkina Faso.

44. In addition, we increased engagement with Nigerians in the diaspora who contribute so much in remittances to their fatherland. Our Administration successfully encouraged more of them to invest in Nigeria and others to return home and join in the task of nation-building.

45. In summary, Your Excellency, distinguished ladies and gentlemen, our administration has done its best to intervene robustly and impact positively on key aspects of our national life.

46. There is no doubt that challenges still abound, but they are surmountable and overwhelming national transformation remains realisable, with continuity, commitment and consistency.

47. Nigeria is blessed with citizens that will always remain faithful, firmly committed to national unity, accelerated political, social and economic development.

4

8. As we hand over the reins of government, I believe that our nation is secure, our democracy is stable, and the future is bright. Let us all work together, and with greater resolve, continue to build a stronger and more prosperous nation.

49. May God Almighty continue to bless our dear country, Nigeria.

50. I thank you all.


Source: 15

Ex-Juventus Star Says Juventus Might Have To Park The Bus Against Barcelona

Featured Image

Gianluca Vialli who won the champions league with Juventus in 1996 has said that the Italian giants may have to ‘park the bus’ against Spanish club, Barcelona when they meet in the UCL finals.

The Italian champions saw off Real Madrid to clinch a spot in the finals and will face Barcelona come June 6 in Berlin, but Vialli believes the Old Lady will have to adopt the approach of Jose Mourinho’s Inter or Roberto Di Matteo’s Chelsea if they are to defeat Luis Enrique’s side.

“They will have to defend with so many men behind the line of the ball, even if that means parking the bus like Mou and Di Matteo,” Vialli said.

“Barcelona are stronger, don’t forget that. They’re best encountered in a one-off game, as they’re rarely below-par twice.

“If you have people like [Lionel] Messi, Neymar and [Luis] Suarez, you can do a lot of damage.”


Source: 360

Yobe Governor Dissolves Cabinet, Sacks All Political Executives

Featured Image

Ahead of Friday’s inauguration, the Governor of Yobe state, Ibrahim Gaidam has dissolved the state executive council and then relieved all political office holders of their appointments, following a lengthy meeting held on Wednesday, May 27, 2015.

This disclosure was delivered by Alhaji Goni Fika, the immediate past commissioner for information on behalf of the governor at a news briefing in Damaturu.

According to him, those affected were the secretary to the state government, Alhaji Babagoni Machina, special advisers, senior special assistants, special assistants and heads of non-statutory boards and parastatals, Daily Trust reports.

The governor directed the out-going commissioners to hand over the affairs of their ministries to their respective permanent secretaries.

During the SEC meeting, N360 million was approved for the construction of access roads and drainages at the Sani Daura Ahmed Housing Estate in Damaturu.

The council also directed the release of N160 million to the Ministry of Works in the state to complete the project.

If we recall, Gaidam was sworn into office on May 29, 2007, as the deputy governor of Yobe state on the All Nigeria Peoples Party platform, he became the governor on January 27, 2009, following the death of the state governor Mamman Bello Ali.


Source: 360

Here’s why Nigerians are crushing on the new president’s daughter Zahra Buhari

Featured Image

Her dad has been recently elected as the new president of the world’s most populous nation but as Zahra Buhari makes her way back to Nigeria from the UK where she lives, all eyes are on her and not her dad and here’s why.

Zahra was on the front line of her father’s very successful presidential campaign with some crediting her for helping to amp up her father’s appeal to Nigeria’s cool, and social media savvy youths.

zahra buhari3

 

She was also very vocal in her criticism of the outgoing President Goodluck Jonathan’s administration, tweeting on many occasions that her father Muhammadu Buhari would bring much needed ‘change’ to the country.

President Buhari arrives Nigeria ahead of tomorrow's inauguration, flanked by Zahra Buhari Photo: Twitter/Bayo Omoboriowo

President Buhari arrives Nigeria ahead of tomorrow’s inauguration, flanked by Zahra Buhari and her brother.Photo: Twitter/Bayo Omoboriowo

Apart from her ‘political activism’, she’s being adored by a growing number of Nigerian men for her good looks and great fashion sense. As her father strolled through the Murtala Muhammad International Airport in Abuja, Zahra opted for a casual chic look in a black blazer and print trousers accessorised with cat eye glasses.

Photo: Zahra Buhari accompanies her der father President Muhammadu Buhari as he arrives Nigeria. Credit: Twitter/Bayo Omoboriowo

Photo: Zahra Buhari accompanies her der father President Muhammadu Buhari as he arrives Nigeria. Credit: Twitter/Bayo Omoboriowo

Is she a socialite? A girl’s rights activist? Budding politician? Or Fashionista? We can’t quite make up our minds yet, but something tells us she’ll bring a certain glitz to her father’s term in government and we can’t wait to see how her role will play out.

 

Source: living12

OldiesButGoodies – [WATCH] Our Top 10 Notorious B.I.G. ThrowBack Songs

Featured Image

 

 

As we close the month of May, it’s only fair we dedicate a Throwback Thursday to the late Christopher Wallace AKA The Notorious B.I.G.

 

BIG, 360Nobs, TBT

 

In case you missed last week’s TBT, have a look here.

 

Back to subject. Born May 21, 1972; he was assassinated in 1997 on March, 9th by an unknown gunman. And in spite of his untimely death, Biggie remains a huge influence in today’s music, especially in the hip hop circles.

 

Erika Ramirez of Billboard defines him in these words: “You can hear his influence on every other rapper in the game. And Biggie not only left a mark on fans and fellow hip-hip artists, but also on the Billboard charts.”

 

Anyways, we delved into our library and collected 10 stellar hits from the Bad Boy big cheese. Have a look, in no particular order, our TBT for today, May 28th, 2015;

 

          BIG POPPA

HYPNOTIZE

MO MONEY MO PROBLEMS

NASTY GIRL

JUICY

(Junior M.A.F.I.A ft Biggie) GET MONEY

WARNING

PARTY & BULLSHIT

EVERYDAY STRUGGLE

IT WAS ALL A DREAM

 

Till next week, stay chilling. One!

 

Images/ Videos: Vibe.com, Latestnewsroom.com, Youtube.com

 

 

 


Source: 360

No regrets losing to Buhari-President Jonathan

Featured Image

President Jonathan,on Wednesday, spoke at a grand House Reception organised in his honour by the Chairman Emeritus of DAAR Communications Plc, High Chief Raymond Dokpesi, owners of AIT and Raypower.

Jonathan, who was also presented by rare mementos by Dokpesi, said:

 ‘‘By this time people are supposed to be running away from someone who has lost an election but I am being celebrated by Daar Communications PLc.
“For me, whatever happened in the election I have accepted it in good faith. Even though, some have argued that those I entrusted with my campaign disappointed me, I have no regrets for losing because in any political processes, there are all kinds of stories and conspiracies.
“We are a very religious society; whether Christians or Muslims or some other religions, I believe it is the will of God that the election went the way it did.
I have always maintained that for the ordinary Nigerian, what is important is the style of governance, not who is even the president.“Anybody can be the President any day but if the country is peaceful, and economic activities are going on smoothly, our children are going to school, hospitals are okay and they can eat what they want to eat, then, of course people will be happy. 

I believe the incoming administration will toe that line and Nigerians will begin to see that there is no difference between political parties because even as we see there is no difference between the PDP and the APC. If you look at the number of people that moved from PDP to APC, then you will really see that both parties are almost the same.What is important to us as Nigerians is what the government is bringing to bear and I have always maintained that politicians must learn to put the people first. If our aspiration is really for the interest of the people, then you wouldn’t want to hurt these people, you wouldn’t want anybody to be slapped because of your own ambition.For me, my ambition is to see what contribution I can make for the ordinary people and that is why their lives are special to me. 

And I wouldn’t do anything that would create crisis, to kill innocent people. ‘‘People should not be surprised for the decision I took. in Nigeria. Doing that is diminishing Nigeria. I wouldn’t want to be a party that will diminish this country.‘‘There is combination of bad and good in my administration just like in any other administration, but what should be uppermost in the mind of the leader is to make sure that the bad is not more than the good. One thing I must always ensure is peace and unity of this country.‘‘We must have a nation before aspiring to hold any position: without a nation, you can’t be elected to any post. I charge all politicians to consider the people first before self. You can lose today and win tomorrow but anybody that dies in the process can’t be revived again. While looking for political offices, we must conduct ourselves in a way that will not halt the lives of innocent people,” Jonathan said.

Vanguard


Source: 15

Okada Rider In Court For Stealing 50 Litres Of Petrol From Police Station

Featured Image

An Okada rider, Abiola Salawu , who allegedly stole 50 litres of petrol from the Ketu Police Station, Lagos State has been arraigned before a Chief Magistrates Court in Ogudu.

Salawu was said to have illegally entered the premises of the Ketu Police Station and stole 50 litres of petrol in the early hours of May 25.

 

According to the Prosecutor, Sgt. Lucky Ihiehie, the stolen product valued was valued at N18, 000 and belonged to the station.

He said that the policemen observed that the petrol inside a gallon was missing from where they kept it.

The officers searched around the area and saw the accused with the same gallon in which they kept the petrol with only 30 litres of the substance remaining.

The prosecutor said that the offence contravened Section 285 of the Criminal Law of Lagos State, 2011.

Salawu, pleaded not guilty to the charge.

 


Source: 360

An Ode To My First Love (Episode 6)

Featured Image

I graduated top of my class with Lydia coming really close but you know what they say; almost never counts. Till date, me and Lydia remain friends. Not just her. There’s Coco, Puffy, Geisha, Ann Tequila, Tope Brad (their nicknames of course!).

All of us would get together at my place after graduation and plot our future. Omo Ode would be a part of this list but we had a falling out so bad(now that I look back, I would have done better) I checked out of our friendship. Who is Omo ode, you would wonder? At the time, my personal person; the bomb.com. we lived together from my second year through to my final year and we were very close-till I checked out of the friendship like it was some hotel.

I remember what we fell out over and how we fell out. It would later form one of the odes I would write to the best friends I have lost. So far, I have had three and they all ended up breaking my heart. Akanji, my first and beloved. Tosin, my second and most heart wrenching and Omo Ode, the final straw that broke the camel or is it my back/heart?

Post my relationship with Imoh and graduation, I swore not to get involved but live my life vicariously through others. ‘You are using people’ may be the first thing that comes to your mind. Get in line! You’re not the first to tell me but I had suffered too much heartbreaks I wasn’t sure I could stand another one.

Tife, a guy that I almost dated nagged this in my memory every day. For once in my life, I remember how we met. Sheila, a then classmate had asked that I please help give something to her friend since I was going to the island. It was one of those rainy days and the Island was as always, flooded. Since there was no Moses to come part this red sea, I decided to use my leg as a navigator. I jumped out of the cab and called Tife. He said he was waiting patiently for me outside his office. Ehn ehn! So this one is forming porche and cannot come and collect his ‘package’ from me abi? Is not kuku his fault. If I did not turn myself to Fedex/the transporter, all this rubbish will not be happening. Good riddance.

I was still fuming when I arrived Tife’s office with my wet foot/shoes. He was very pleasant and had a very flirty eyes (or was I out of a relationship for that long and any eyes could have been flirty?). He was really apologetic for my ordeal and offered to take me to dinner.

During dinner, we talked like we had known each other a long time and when I started shivering, he was right beside me; offering his jacket and body to warm me up. See gobe! I also turned up my flirt heat.

We decided his car should not travel in the red sea and so we decided to share a cab.

Tife and I were attracted to each other and we knew it! Everything we said to each other, every physical contact made was so sexual! Still, we both choose not to act on it.

When we both reached our various homes, Tife called to say goodnight. We finally did that at way past midnight. When I clicked my red button, I questioned the attraction. Even with Gabriel, it wasn’t this heated. Was Tife my soul mate and I was only fooling myself with Gabriel?

Tife’s call woke me the next morning. And the next morning and more mornings to come after that.

‘The number you have dialed is switched off. Please try again later. Thank you’ I had tried Gabriel’s number again and I was still getting the same response. I returned Tife’s phone to him in anger and explained about Gabriel to him. By now, we had started visiting each other and made a point to have lunch at least three times a week.

‘Maybe he lost his phone and couldn’t find your number?’ Tife said. I asked Tife to close his eyes and recite my number. He did. As far as I am concerned, Gabriel doesn’t have an excuse.

As I and Tife became inseparable, Sheila got concerned and decided to report me to Tife’s ex.

Tife and I had just finished dinner and were lying in his apartment in the dark, each with our own thoughts, when his phone rang. It was his ex and she opined that based on her findings about me, I was just out to use and dump Tife-everyone knew that was my style.

Tife thanked her and promised to avoid me. I stood up and was on my way out when Tife asked where I was going. ‘Home’ I responded. I was close to the door when he got in front of me. He asked why. I told him I didn’t want to ruin his life as his ex thinks and I just wanted to disa… I didn’t even finish the statement. Tife was in my mouth. He held my tongue captive with his lips as he gently whispered in my ear to shut the hell up. I had no plans to complain. This was a welcomed development. The kiss was so passionate and I started to relax. I heard the hook of my bra pop. That’s when the guilt started to rush in. I felt like I was cheating on Gabriel. I pushed Tife off me and hooked my bra.

Tife calmed down and told me how attracted he is to me. It’s a miracle he hasn’t kissed me till now. As he talked, he got close again and kissed me. I responded so naturally. Tife asked me to give us a chance. I took off. No response. I was torn.

I would later meet Tife a few years down the line. We talked at length and he explained to me that he wasn’t looking for a relationship. How about friends with benefit? That was the last day I spoke to him.

Even Gabriel would never suggest a thing like this. ‘The number you have dialed is switched off. Please try again later. Thank you’.

Its been nearly two years since I last spoke to the love of my life. Oh Gabriel! Where are you?

 

Surely as I blossomed into this smart, beautiful (inner beauty) and charming young lady, I would have a series of likers, toasters and one night smooches (I can’t call them stands because there was no sex involved just a lot of kisses and touches and everyone moved on quickly from there). A lot of really good guys fall into this category and because we all saw our one night smooch for what it was, we could remain friends a long time.

I started to focus more on my budding career as a communications specialist and was constantly learning from different schools. I love to break rules. Never been one for dogma. Still, I realize that I first must learn the rules so I know how to break, bend and or twist them however I find necessary.

People around me would call me various names; weird, non-conformist, creatively restless but I just wanted to find fresh and refreshing approaches to make things work. For me, nothing was cast in stone. An open mind is a winning strategy for me plus I felt really great about myself.

I started to almost forget about Gabriel save for my brother’s friend, Gabriel who gradually became a constant figure in my parent’s house. Whenever someone challenged/accused him, he would beat his chest and say ‘Emi Olugabriel!’Olugabriel ko, Olumicheal ni! Good riddance.

My relationship with my mom was getting better. My mom. My rock. My super and wonder woman all wrapped up in one! We were almost best buds and my siblings would envy me save for the day I would rock one of her bags or shoes and she would yab me and my ancestors in full public view for not asking her permission.

We were seeing an Indian movie together with my other siblings. Someone dies and is burnt at the funeral. My sister comments on how easy and economical the burial is. I agreed with her it was really no fuss and easy to carry out. My brother also agrees and wished that was our culture here in Naija. My mom looks to my cousin who was present and begs him to please make sure we don’t burn her when she dies if not, she’s coming for him from the grave. We laughed so hard tears were rolling down our eyes.

I was enjoying this family time and didn’t appreciate it when Gloria, my friend and senior colleague, calls me. ‘Babe, biko, you fit show for work? That my client just revert and I need you for brainstorm’. Brain storm for, brain drain ni. I explain carefully to Gloria that it was a Saturday and I needed to spend time with my folks. Gloria continued to try and persuade me so I pretended the network was bad and cut her off. I put my phone on silent and went to the kitchen to steal some cake from my sister’s share in the fridge. My sister joins me in the kitchen with my phone to her ear. She hands it to me and says ‘it’s for you!’duh! It’s my phone!

Hello Gloria, I can’t make it, im so… ‘Tobi, this is Gabriel’

Source: 29

An Ode To My First Love (Episode 6)

Featured Image

I graduated top of my class with Lydia coming really close but you know what they say; almost never counts. Till date, me and Lydia remain friends. Not just her. There’s Coco, Puffy, Geisha, Ann Tequila, Tope Brad (their nicknames of course!).

All of us would get together at my place after graduation and plot our future. Omo Ode would be a part of this list but we had a falling out so bad(now that I look back, I would have done better) I checked out of our friendship. Who is Omo ode, you would wonder? At the time, my personal person; the bomb.com. we lived together from my second year through to my final year and we were very close-till I checked out of the friendship like it was some hotel.

I remember what we fell out over and how we fell out. It would later form one of the odes I would write to the best friends I have lost. So far, I have had three and they all ended up breaking my heart. Akanji, my first and beloved. Tosin, my second and most heart wrenching and Omo Ode, the final straw that broke the camel or is it my back/heart?

Post my relationship with Imoh and graduation, I swore not to get involved but live my life vicariously through others. ‘You are using people’ may be the first thing that comes to your mind. Get in line! You’re not the first to tell me but I had suffered too much heartbreaks I wasn’t sure I could stand another one.

Tife, a guy that I almost dated nagged this in my memory every day. For once in my life, I remember how we met. Sheila, a then classmate had asked that I please help give something to her friend since I was going to the island. It was one of those rainy days and the Island was as always, flooded. Since there was no Moses to come part this red sea, I decided to use my leg as a navigator. I jumped out of the cab and called Tife. He said he was waiting patiently for me outside his office. Ehn ehn! So this one is forming porche and cannot come and collect his ‘package’ from me abi? Is not kuku his fault. If I did not turn myself to Fedex/the transporter, all this rubbish will not be happening. Good riddance.

I was still fuming when I arrived Tife’s office with my wet foot/shoes. He was very pleasant and had a very flirty eyes (or was I out of a relationship for that long and any eyes could have been flirty?). He was really apologetic for my ordeal and offered to take me to dinner.

During dinner, we talked like we had known each other a long time and when I started shivering, he was right beside me; offering his jacket and body to warm me up. See gobe! I also turned up my flirt heat.

We decided his car should not travel in the red sea and so we decided to share a cab.

Tife and I were attracted to each other and we knew it! Everything we said to each other, every physical contact made was so sexual! Still, we both choose not to act on it.

When we both reached our various homes, Tife called to say goodnight. We finally did that at way past midnight. When I clicked my red button, I questioned the attraction. Even with Gabriel, it wasn’t this heated. Was Tife my soul mate and I was only fooling myself with Gabriel?

Tife’s call woke me the next morning. And the next morning and more mornings to come after that.

‘The number you have dialed is switched off. Please try again later. Thank you’ I had tried Gabriel’s number again and I was still getting the same response. I returned Tife’s phone to him in anger and explained about Gabriel to him. By now, we had started visiting each other and made a point to have lunch at least three times a week.

‘Maybe he lost his phone and couldn’t find your number?’ Tife said. I asked Tife to close his eyes and recite my number. He did. As far as I am concerned, Gabriel doesn’t have an excuse.

As I and Tife became inseparable, Sheila got concerned and decided to report me to Tife’s ex.

Tife and I had just finished dinner and were lying in his apartment in the dark, each with our own thoughts, when his phone rang. It was his ex and she opined that based on her findings about me, I was just out to use and dump Tife-everyone knew that was my style.

Tife thanked her and promised to avoid me. I stood up and was on my way out when Tife asked where I was going. ‘Home’ I responded. I was close to the door when he got in front of me. He asked why. I told him I didn’t want to ruin his life as his ex thinks and I just wanted to disa… I didn’t even finish the statement. Tife was in my mouth. He held my tongue captive with his lips as he gently whispered in my ear to shut the hell up. I had no plans to complain. This was a welcomed development. The kiss was so passionate and I started to relax. I heard the hook of my bra pop. That’s when the guilt started to rush in. I felt like I was cheating on Gabriel. I pushed Tife off me and hooked my bra.

Tife calmed down and told me how attracted he is to me. It’s a miracle he hasn’t kissed me till now. As he talked, he got close again and kissed me. I responded so naturally. Tife asked me to give us a chance. I took off. No response. I was torn.

I would later meet Tife a few years down the line. We talked at length and he explained to me that he wasn’t looking for a relationship. How about friends with benefit? That was the last day I spoke to him.

Even Gabriel would never suggest a thing like this. ‘The number you have dialed is switched off. Please try again later. Thank you’.

Its been nearly two years since I last spoke to the love of my life. Oh Gabriel! Where are you?

 

Surely as I blossomed into this smart, beautiful (inner beauty) and charming young lady, I would have a series of likers, toasters and one night smooches (I can’t call them stands because there was no sex involved just a lot of kisses and touches and everyone moved on quickly from there). A lot of really good guys fall into this category and because we all saw our one night smooch for what it was, we could remain friends a long time.

I started to focus more on my budding career as a communications specialist and was constantly learning from different schools. I love to break rules. Never been one for dogma. Still, I realize that I first must learn the rules so I know how to break, bend and or twist them however I find necessary.

People around me would call me various names; weird, non-conformist, creatively restless but I just wanted to find fresh and refreshing approaches to make things work. For me, nothing was cast in stone. An open mind is a winning strategy for me plus I felt really great about myself.

I started to almost forget about Gabriel save for my brother’s friend, Gabriel who gradually became a constant figure in my parent’s house. Whenever someone challenged/accused him, he would beat his chest and say ‘Emi Olugabriel!’Olugabriel ko, Olumicheal ni! Good riddance.

My relationship with my mom was getting better. My mom. My rock. My super and wonder woman all wrapped up in one! We were almost best buds and my siblings would envy me save for the day I would rock one of her bags or shoes and she would yab me and my ancestors in full public view for not asking her permission.

We were seeing an Indian movie together with my other siblings. Someone dies and is burnt at the funeral. My sister comments on how easy and economical the burial is. I agreed with her it was really no fuss and easy to carry out. My brother also agrees and wished that was our culture here in Naija. My mom looks to my cousin who was present and begs him to please make sure we don’t burn her when she dies if not, she’s coming for him from the grave. We laughed so hard tears were rolling down our eyes.

I was enjoying this family time and didn’t appreciate it when Gloria, my friend and senior colleague, calls me. ‘Babe, biko, you fit show for work? That my client just revert and I need you for brainstorm’. Brain storm for, brain drain ni. I explain carefully to Gloria that it was a Saturday and I needed to spend time with my folks. Gloria continued to try and persuade me so I pretended the network was bad and cut her off. I put my phone on silent and went to the kitchen to steal some cake from my sister’s share in the fridge. My sister joins me in the kitchen with my phone to her ear. She hands it to me and says ‘it’s for you!’duh! It’s my phone!

Hello Gloria, I can’t make it, im so… ‘Tobi, this is Gabriel’


Source: 360

Graphic! Ghanaian girl dies after being electrocuted by Power Bank while charging her phone

Featured Image

Just got this sad and shocking report from blog reader, Amy George.Its just so shocking  that a ‘mere”power bank could do this..We should be careful with what we buy,especially imitation..

A young Ghanaian girl identified as Blandine (I attached the pix) was on May 25th electrocuted to death after the power bank she was using to charge her phone got stuck on her skin and electrocuted her. According to reports from Dumsor, Ghana, the girl was chatting with a friend when she fell asleep and placed the power bank she was using to charge her phone around her breast region. She had connected the power bank to an electricity source so it can charge when power is restored. As power was restored to her area, their was a power surge, the power bank got heated and got stuck on her skin, electrocuting her to death. Her parents found her dead. So sad!

Little things we over look might carry death in its wings. Let’s all be careful.
Graphic pic below..


Source: 15

Jonathan Tenders Handover Notes To Buhari

Featured Image

The executive summary of the handover note has been presented to the incoming President, Muhammadu Buhari by his predecessor, Dr. Goodluck Jonathan maintaining that he has done his best for Nigeria.

Buhari who while receiving the note categorically said he would not comment on them commended Jonathan once again for conceding the March 28 presidential election.

 

handover notes

handover notes1 handover notes3

 

handover notes5


Source: 360

President Zuma Dares NANS, Jets Off To Nigeria

Featured Image

The President of South Africa, Jacob Zuma will jet off to Nigeria for president-elect Muhammadu Buhari’s inauguration, his office said on Thursday.

According to News24, President Zuma’s trip will be a ”working visit” and besides Buhari’s inaugurations, it will also give the two presidents the opportunity to discuss issues of mutual concern.

It would be recalled that, the National Association of Nigerian Students, NANS urged the South African President to stay away from the inauguration of the President-elect, Muhammadu Buhari, following the spate of xenophobic attacks and the way his government handled it.

The group furthermore threatened to storm the Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport, Abuja, should Zuma step into the country’s airport.

However, if the report is released as planned, Zuma will be fulfilling presidential duties in Nigeria such as enhancing the ”good” bilateral relations between the two countries, and strengthening economic ties.

”President Zuma also congratulated the people of Nigeria for conducting a peaceful, transparent, credible, free and fair election as declared by the Independent National Election Commission of Nigeria.”

Zuma will be accompanied by Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, Minister of International Relations and Co-operation.


Source: 360

Highly Reputed as Architect of the Modern FirstBank, Onasanya Retires as Group Managing Director

Featured Image

PRESS RELEASE

Mr. Bisi Onasanya is set to retire at a high point of his career as Group Managing Director/Chief Executive Officer, First Bank of Nigeria Limited, a subsidiary of FBN Holdings Plc and Nigeria’s most valuable banking brand, at the successful completion of his tenure. His retirement takes effect at the end of the current Financial Year on December 31 2015. Mr. Onasanya is retiring on the heels of an inspiring and enviable career spanning over three decades of diverse management and operational experience, 21 years of which he has spent with FirstBank, serving meritoriously in the last six years as Group Managing Director/CEO. He has been able to stabilise and modernise the expanding FirstBank brand since his appointment in 2009, thus reinforcing the confidence of the bank’s diverse stakeholders and the global financial publics.

Mr. Onasanya’s successor will be announced in the last quarter prior to his exit. This is in sync with FirstBank’s corporate governance practice, which provides for seamless transition for the office of Group Managing Director. As is well known, FirstBank’s corporate governance posture has won it much respect and awards both locally and internationally.

 

A seasoned banker and chartered accountant, Mr. Onasanya is a highly respected and personable executive who has established a reputation at FirstBank for solid performance and sound judgment. He is widely reputed as the architect of the modern FirstBank, associated with various innovative and creative achievements. He was Project Coordinator of Century 2 the new frontier, FirstBank’s far-reaching enterprise transformation project at the turn of the century, as well as Project Coordinator of the FirstBank Corporate Transformation project which has seen the bank accentuating its foothold on modernisation. Mr. Onasanya also superintended the latest composite Corporate Identity/Brand Refresh of the FirstBank Group, a bold step heralding the international expansion of the FirstBank brand.

 

A corporate strategy and development pacesetter, Mr. Onasanya has ensured the steady internationalisation of FirstBank, which under his leadership now boasts of subsidiaries with operations across Africa, Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

 

He is also reputed as a people person having pioneered significant transformation in the development of staff at FirstBank. His tenure saw the transformation of the bank’s training centre into FirstAcademy, a best in class corporate university that recently clinched the 2015 Global Council of Corporate Universities Award for best impact by a corporate university on the implementation of business strategies. The bank has also received the highly coveted Best Place to Work award.

 

An articulate and insightful thought leader in the financial services industry, Mr. Onasanya has made meaningful contributions as a member of the Bankers Committee and is the Chairman of the Sub Committee on Ethics and Professionalism. He has served as a member of the Chartered Institute of Bankers Sub-Committee on Fiscal and Monetary Policies and a member of the Presidential Committee on Reduction of Interest Rates. He has also delivered several papers and served on various conferences C-Suite panels across the globe. He is Editor of the new book, “Perspectives on Banking in Nigeria”, featuring a collection of learned articles by banking and finance professionals including operators, regulators and academics.

 

Mr. Onasanya is a Director of Africa Finance Corporation (AFC) and has been Chairman of First Registrars Nigeria Limited, Kakawa Discount House Limited, FBN Bank UK Limited and Unified Payments Limited. A Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Nigeria he is also an Associate Member of the Nigerian Institute of Taxation and a Fellow and Member of Council of the Chartered Institute of Bankers. Mr. Onasanya was early in 2015 honoured as The Sun Man of the Year 2014 and Newswatch Man of the Year 2014 respectively, in recognition of his outstanding contributions to national development in the financial services industry.

 

Under Mr. Onasanya’s leadership FirstBank has been back to back winner of both national and international awards, having been named “The Best Bank Brand in Nigeria” four times in a row – 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014 – by the globally renowned “The Banker Magazine” of the Financial Times Group. For four consecutive years, 2012, 2013, 2014, and 2015 FirstBank has been named the “Best Retail Bank in Nigeria” by the Asian Banker International Excellence in Retail Financial Services Awards. Other recent awards include the “Best Bank in Nigeria” in the Euromoney Awards for Excellence, “Best Bank in West Africa” and “Most Innovative Bank in Africa” in the African Banker Awards, “Best Bank in Nigeria” in the EMEA Finance African Banking Awards for the fourth time, “Best Foreign Exchange Services in Africa” in the EMEA Finance Treasury Services Awards, “Best Banking Group in Nigeria” by World Finance Banking Awards, and “Best Financial Reporting Company” by Africa Investor.


Source: 360

PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURATION: Stay At Home If You Don’t Have An Invitation, It’s Not A Convention – APC

Featured Image

Barely 24 hours to the inauguration of the new administration to pilot the affairs of Nigeria for the next four years, the All Progressives Congress, APC, has urged members of the public and supporters of the party nationwide who haven’t got an invitation to attend the ceremony scheduled for Friday, May 29, 2015, to kindly stay indoors and follow the proceedings via radio and television.

Former military dictator turn convert democrat, Muhammadu Buhari, is the President-Elect of the West African nation.

He pushed the boundaries, March 28, 2015 by defeating the incumbent President Goodluck Jonathan of the Peoples Democratic Party, PDP, at the Presidential polls.

The APC made this known via a press statement released by Garba Shehu, the head of the President-elect media team.

Read the full statement below:

 

Stay home


Source: 360

Three things Nigerians want President Muhammadu Buhari to sort- Power, corruption and unemployment

Featured Image

It’s only a few hours to the inauguration of Nigeria’s president elect General Muhammadu Buhari into office on Friday, the 29th May. Foreign dignitaries including the US Secretary of State John Kerry have already arrived in Nigeria ahead of the celebrations and the man of the moment Buhari himself has been photographed arriving the country from London flanked by his family.

As Nigerians begin to look forward to what has been termed a ‘new beginning’ in Nigeria’s future, many have already begun to express what they feel the President should tackle first amongst the country’s myriad of problems. Chief among the list is Power. Nigeria, despite being the biggest economy in Africa still suffers from crippling power supply despite the privatisation of the sector and various reforms by successive governments, constant electricity is still an elusive theory in a country littered with generators and inverters.

In the past week alone, some areas of the country reportedly went without electricity for up to 72 hours after oil marketers went on strike over pay disputes under the current government.

Corruption has always been a huge problem for Nigeria and General Buhari is seen as a strong hand who can clean up the country and get rid of corrupt officials. How well he’d be able to achieve this considering how entrenched the problem is at all levels in the country will be a huge test of his administrations success.

Youth unemployment, education, the missing Chibok girls and regulation of the country’s oil sector are also top amongst the list of concerns for many Nigerians, as seen in this cross section of tweets on the BBC Africa timeline. The news organisation asked its followers to tweet what they wanted the President to focus on first during his first few months in office using the hashtag #dearbuhari.

It’s safe to say that if the new president only sorts out the country’s power sector at the very least, he may easily go down as the most popular leader ever to have ruled Africa’s most populous nation.

Source: living12

[WATCH] Here’s Kendrick Lamar’s ‘These Walls’ Performance On ‘Ellen’

Featured Image

 

From his hugely acclaimed, chart-topping ‘How To Pimp A Butterfly’ album, Kendrick Lamar delivered a like-no-other performance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show yesterday afternoon, bringing on a pair of ballroom dancers who did their stuff as a painter created a portrait of them right there.

 

Artsy, creative stuff. Jump on it below –

         

Image/ Video: Rap-up.com, Spin.com


Source: 360